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Memoir

Warren William Chase
Regents' Proceedings 1514

WARREN WILLIAM CHASE, Professor of Wildlife Management and for many years Chairman of the Department of Wildlife Management in the School of Natural Resources, has received permission formally to retire from the active faculty on May 22, at the age of sixty-four.

A native Minnesotan, Professor Chase was graduated from Macalester College in St. Paul, and earned his master's and doctor's degrees from the University of Minnesota. There also, as an instructor in forestry, he gained his first teaching experience. For more than a decade thereafter, he served as a game conservationist and senior biologist with the United States Department of Agriculture. In 1945 he came to the University as Professor of Wildlife Management, and five years later he was appointed chairman of the newly instituted department in that specialty.

Professor Chase possessed a wide range of abilities-pedagogic, scientific, administrative, and political-all these being needful to a discipline which is at once academic, scientific, and involved in public policy. He stimulated the best efforts of his students, both on campus and at Camp Filibert Roth. He inquired deeply and precisely into many aspects of our natural resources, including tree physiology, soil conservation, and the relationship between plant and animal life; some of his later research shed significant light on the sentimentally vexed question of the Michigan deer herd.

Having been chiefly responsible for organizing the study of wildlife management here, he served on numerous administrative committees of his own School, of the Graduate School, and of other units or agencies within the University, the state, and the nation. He was an active member and committeeman of professional associations, among them president of the Wildlife Society and a visiting lecturer on behalf of the Society of American Foresters. He exhibited, finally, gifts of tact and accommodation, which greatly benefited the relations of his Department and School with other agencies and groups sharing the same interests.

Now that he is retiring, the Regents of the University would thank him most warmly for his faithful and efficacious offices, and express to him their personal admiration and esteem. They trust that he will fully avail himself of the perquisites of WARREN WILLIAM CHASE, Professor of Wildlife Management and for many years Chairman of the Department of Wildlife Management in the School of Natural Resources, has received permission formally to retire from the active faculty on May 22, at the age of sixty-four.

A native Minnesotan, Professor Chase was graduated from Macalester College in St. Paul, and earned his master's and doctor's degrees from the University of Minnesota. There also, as an instructor in forestry, he gained his first teaching experience. For more than a decade thereafter, he served as a game conservationist and senior biologist with the United States Department of Agriculture. In 1945 he came to the University as Professor of Wildlife Management, and five years later he was appointed chairman of the newly instituted department in that specialty.

Professor Chase possessed a wide range of abilities-pedagogic, scientific, administrative, and political-all these being needful to a discipline which is at once academic, scientific, and involved in public policy. He stimulated the best efforts of his students, both on campus and at Camp Filibert Roth. He inquired deeply and precisely into many aspects of our natural resources, including tree physiology, soil conservation, and the relationship between plant and animal life; some of his later research shed significant light on the sentimentally vexed question of the Michigan deer herd.

Having been chiefly responsible for organizing the study of wildlife management here, he served on numerous administrative committees of his own School, of the Graduate School, and of other units or agencies within the University, the state, and the nation. He was an active member and committeeman of professional associations, among them president of the Wildlife Society and a visiting lecturer on behalf of the Society of American Foresters. He exhibited, finally, gifts of tact and accommodation, which greatly benefited the relations of his Department and School with other agencies and groups sharing the same interests.

Now that he is retiring, the Regents of the University would thank him most warmly for his faithful and efficacious offices, and express to him their personal admiration and esteem. They trust that he will fully avail himself of the perquisites of his new rank, which is titled Professor Emeritus of Wildlife Management.