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Memoir

D. Roger Glass
Regents' Proceedings 143

D. Roger Glass, research scientist, Department of Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, retired from active faculty status on August 31, 1996, after a 50-year career at the University of Michigan.

Mr. Glass received his B.S., M.S., and Ae.E. degrees from the University of Michigan in 1946, 1951, and 1967, respectively. He joined the University of Michigan staff in 1946 as a research assistant. He was promoted to research associate in 1948, research engineer in 1951, and research scientist in 1974. He was appointed associate head of the Gas Dynamics Laboratories of the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1966. Mr. Glass has made significant research and design contributions in many areas. Early research involved theoretical calculations of the performance of supersonic ram jets as possible propulsion systems for interceptors of intercontinental ballistic missiles. Later, he was involved in numerous research projects in the area of combustion. Other areas of research included hypersonic wind tunnel design and testing, high altitude sampling techniques, the study of aerodynamic drag of automotive vehicles, and investigation of the dispersion of exhaust stack gases from large buildings. He has conducted extensive studies of the performance of automotive air bags and cooling systems and a wide variety of subsonic wind tunnel experiments. He also made significant contributions to the design of supersonic nozzles for blowing oxygen into molten iron as part of the steel-making process.

As associate head of the Gas Dynamics Laboratories, Mr. Glass has played a crucial supporting role in all experimental activities within the Department of Aerospace Engineering. He has been a leader in ensuring the operation and improvements of laboratory facilities and has been responsible for the supervision of the technical staff. A significant portion of his activities has included teaching, advising, and working with students involved in experimental research. His kind and expert advice and assistance have helped to smooth the path for many Ph.D. students. In recognition of his outstanding service, he received the Departmental Service Award in 1995.

Mr. Glass's retirement following his 50-year commitment to the Department of Aerospace Engineering leaves a gap that will be difficult to fill. The Regents now salute this research scientist by naming D. Roger Glass research scientist emeritus.