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Memoir

Charles A. Tait
Regent's Proceedings 146

Charles A. Tait, associate professor of education and audiology, School of Education, and associate research scientist, Communicative Disorders Clinic, will retire from active faculty status on November 30, 1998, after 27 years of service to the University of Michigan.

Professor Tait received his B.S. (1957) and M.Ed. (1961) degrees from Wayne State University and his Ph.D. degree (1965) from Stanford University. From 1958-61, he was a speech and hearing therapist at the Maricopa County school district, and from 1964-71 he was an assistant, then associate professor at the University of Wisconsin. He came to the University of Michigan in 1971 as an associate professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical School and in 1978; he became an associate professor in the School of Education. He was named director of Camp Shady Trails in 1987 and served in that capacity until 1991. In 1977-78, he was a visiting professor of audiology at Hebrew University.

Within the School of Education, Professor Tait served on the executive committee, research committee, promotion committee and the Human Subjects Review Committee and was assistant dean from 1988-89. At the University level, he served on Rackham's Dissertation Grant Committee and on the University Grievance Committee. As an undergraduate advisor in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, he enjoyed a reputation for being knowledgeable, helpful, respected, and well liked. Professor Tait taught undergraduate courses in speech and language pathology and audiology and graduate courses in auditory assessment of children, experimental hearing science, and research in audiology. His numerous publications with graduate students as co-authors provide evidence of his considerable ability as a mentor.

Professor Tait maintained memberships in the American Speech Language and Hearing Association and the Michigan Speech and Hearing Association. He regularly presented papers at national and international meetings, and his articles appeared in Ear and Hearing, Journal of Auditory Research, and Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, among others.

The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Charles A. Tait associate professor emeritus of education and audiology and associate research scientist emeritus.